Three alternative ways to keep mosquitoes away

- It is summer which means that we are on heightened alert for mosquitos and the illness they can carry, such as West Nile Virus and now the Zika Virus.

The good news is there is technology out there that can help prevent a nasty encounter, some which you can even wear, that don’t necessarily rely on harsh chemicals. Here is a look at three of those products:

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Repellent clothing

How about a t-shirt that repels mosquitos? Repellent apparel from Insect Shield uses a man-made version of a chemical found in chrysanthemums. Insect Shield says the chemical allethrin in their clothing wards off insects.

Their products range from bandanas to hats, socks to shirts, and even socks. Clothing comes in men's, women's, maternity, and youth. There are even wearable repellent for pets as well as camping accessories. They also offer treatments for the beloved clothes you already own.

Insect Shield can get pricey, but is comparable to some to everyday clothing on the market and lasts to up to 70 wash cycles. They also often have online sales. You can learn more at insectshield.com.

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Repellent patches

N'visib1e is a patch from Ntrinsiq Works. The patch only contains vitamin B1 Thiamin which they say masks the human emissions from your skin which attract mosquitoes. It markets itself as a safe, natural alternative to DEET.

The patch takes about 30 minutes to become fully effective and the maker recommends up to two patches per person, but the good news is the patch lasts for up to 36 hours. The patch is not recommended for confined spaces.

A pack of 30 patches will run you just under $10. For more information check out Ntrinsiq.com.

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Repellent lanterns

Thermacell repellent lanterns create a 15-by-15 foot mosquito repellent zone. It is powered by a butane cartridge to produce heat to release the active chemical in the product, but doesn’t have an open flame. They use allethrin, a synthetic copy of a natural repellent found in chrysanthemum plants.

The lantern will run you a little more than $20 to about $60, depending on the model. Refill costs breaks down to between about $0.30 and $0.80 per hour of use, again depending on the type of refill package purchased. For more information thermacell.com.

The Centers for Disease Control says there have been 700 confirmed cases of Zika virus in the United States. They recommend wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants while outside, as well as limiting outdoor exposure. They also recommend the use of chemical repellents use of those only approved by the EPA.

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